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Ireland in the Age of Revolution, 1760–1805


Editor: Harry T Dickinson

Part I
3 volume set: 1200pp: 234x156mm: 2013
978 1 84893 300 2: £275/$495
Part II
3 volume set: 1248pp: 234x156mm: 2013
978 1 84893 301 9: £275/$495

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The latter half of the eighteenth-century saw Irish opposition movements being greatly influenced by the American and French revolutions. The political landscape of the country underwent dramatic changes as both Protestant and Catholic groups expanded their ideologies in reaction to this foreign radicalism.

This two-part edition illustrates the depth and reach of this influence by collecting rare pamphlets dealing with the major political issues of these decades. Part I covers the impact of the American Revolution on Irish radicalism and the rise of the Irish Volunteers. Part II presents materials prompted by the French Revolution, including the ideology of the Society of United Irishmen. The edition includes a general introduction, thematic introductions to each part, headnotes and endnotes. It will be of great value to scholars of Irish history as well as those interested in the wider impact of the French and American revolutions.

  • Includes over seventy pamphlets never previously republished
  • Most texts are reproduced in full
  • All texts are fully reset
  • Full editorial apparatus includes a general introduction, volume introductions, headnotes and endnotes
  • Consolidated index in the final volume

Part I: Ireland and the American Revolution

General Introduction

Volume 1: 1760–1779

Henry Brooke, The Case of the Roman-Catholics of Ireland (1760); Charles Lucas, Seasonable Advice to the Electors of Members of Parlement at the ensuing General Election (1760); Charles Lucas, An Address to the Free Electors of the City of Dublin (1761); James Caldwell, A Brief Examination of the Question Whether it is Expedient either in a Religious or Political View, to Pass an Act to Enable Papists to take Real Securities for Money which they may Lend (1764); Charles Lucas, To the Right Honorable the Lord-Mayer, the Alderman, Sheriffs, Commons, Citizens, and Freeholds of Dublin (1765); To the Right Honourable Lord Mayor of the City of Dublin. The Counter Address of a Free Citizen (1766); A Candid Enquiry into the Causes and Motives of the Late Riots in the Province of Munster in Ireland (1767); An Essay on the Use and Necessity of Establishing a Militia in Ireland and Some Hints Towards a Plan for that Purpose (1767); An Act of Limiting the Duration of Parliaments (1768); Charles Lucas, Seasonable Advice to the Electors of Members of Parlement at the Ensuing General Election, pt 2 (1768); Charles Lucas, The Rights and Privileges of Parlements Asserted upon Constitutional Principles (1770); [Robert French], The Constitution of Ireland, and Poyning’s Laws Explained, by a Friend to his Country (1770); An Essay on the Character and Conduct of His Excellency Lord Visc. Townshend (1771); A Select Collection of Fugitive Political Pieces, 2nd edn (1773); The Statutes at Large, Passed in the Parliaments held in Ireland, Vol X [Catholic Relief Act] (1774); An Appeal to the Understanding of the Electors of Ireland (1776); The Statutes at Large, Passed in the Parliaments held in Ireland, Vol XI [Catholic Relief Act] (1778); Humble Remonstrance for the Repeal of the Laws Against the Roman Catholics (1778); A Defence of Great Britain, Against a Charge of tTyranny in the Government of Ireland, by an Irishman (1779); Renovation Without Violence Yet Possible (1779)

Volume 2: 1779–1782

James Crombie, The Expedience and Utility of Volunteer Associations for National Defence and Security (1779); W S Dickson, A Sermon on the Propriety and Advantages of Acquiring the Knowledge and Use of Arms (1779); A Candid Display, or The Reciprocal Conduct of Great Britain and her Colonies ([1780]); Henry Grattan’s Speech to the Irish House of Commons, 19 April 1780 (1821); Debates in the House of Commons of Ireland, 2nd edn (1780); The Usurpations of England (1780); Francis Dobbs, Letter to the Right Honourable Lord North, on his Propositions in Favour of Ireland (1780); An Act for the Advancement of The Trade of this Kingdom, in The Statutes at Large (1780); An Act to Allow Ireland to Trade with British Colonies and Settlements, in The Statutes at Large (1780); An Act for the Partial Repeal of the Irish Test Act, in The Statutes at Large (1780); Francis Dobbs, Thoughts on Volunteers (1780); C H Wilson, A Compleat Collection of the Resolutions of the Volunteers, Grand Juries, &c of Ireland (1782); The Parliamentary Register: or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons of Ireland of 1781–2, 2nd edn (1784); Speeches of Henry Grattan in the Irish Parliament, 19 February and 16 April 1782 (1821); The Celebrated Speeches of Colonel Henry Flood, on the Repeal of the Declaratory Act ... and the Speech of Lord Abingdon in the English House of Peers (1782)

Selected Acts of 1782 from The Statutes at Large (1786): An Act for the Further Relief of His Majesty's Subjects of this Kingdom Professing the Popish Religion; An Act to Regulate the Manner of Passing Bills, and to Prevent Delays in Summoning of Parliaments; An Act for Extending certain of the Provisions, contained in an Act, intitled, An Act Confirming all the Statues made in England; An Act for Redress of Erroneous Judgments, Orders, and Decrees; An Act for Securing the Independency of Judges, and the Impartial Administration of Justice

Debates of 1782, from W Cobbett (ed.), The Parliamentary History of England; An Act for the Better of Securing the Dependency of the Kingdom of Ireland upon the Crown of Great Britain (1782), in The Statues at Large (1786); An Act for the Removing and Preventing All Doubt which have Arisen, or Might Arise, concerning the Exclusive Rights of the Parliament and Courts of Ireland (1783), in The Statues at Large (1786)

Volume 3: 1782–1789

A Letter to Henry Flood, Esq. on the Present State of Representation in Ireland (1782); R Lewis, Common Sense, and Common Humanity (1782); Francis Dobbs, Thoughts on the Conduct and Continuation of the Volunteers of Ireland (1783); An Address to the Dungannon and Leinster Volunteer Delegates on the Matter of Parliamentary Reform (1783); A Reform of the Irish House of Commons (1783); Arguments to Prove the Interposition of the People to be Constitutional and Strictly Legal (1783); W W Seward, The Rights of the People Asserted (1783); Dr Patrick Duigenan, The Alarm: or, An Address to the Nobility, Gentry, and Clergy, of the Church of Ireland (1783); All’s Well: A Reply to the Author of the Alarm (1783); John Keogh, Thoughts on Equal Representation (1784); Peter Burrowes, Plain Arguments in Defence of the People’s Absolute Dominion over the Constitution (1784); Andrew Doria, A Letter to the Volunteers, upon the subject of a Parliamentary Reform (1784); John Jebb, Letters Addressed to the Volunteers of Ireland, on the Subject of a Parliamentary Reform (1784); Capel Molyneux, A Warm Appeal to the Freemen of Ireland (1784); Charles Francis Sheridan, Free Thoughts upon the Present Crisis (1785); A Letter from the Secretary of State to the Mayor of Cork (1785); A Series of Letters Addressed to the Volunteers of Ireland (1785); Thoughts on the Kingdom of Ireland, Written in the Year 1785 ([c.1785]); The Utility of an Union between Great Britain and Ireland (1787); ‘An Act to Prevent Tumultuous Risings and Assemblies!’, in The Statutes at Large (1787); An Address to the Independent Members of the House of Commons of Ireland on the Question of Establishing a Regency in this Kingdom (1789); Common Sense in Vindication of his Excellency the Marquis of Buckingham (1789)

Part II: Ireland and the French Revolution

Preface
Introduction to Part II

Volume 4: 1791–1797
Declaration of the Catholic Society of Dublin ([1791]); Strictures on the Declaration of the Society Instituted for the Purpose of Promoting Unanimity amongst Irishmen, and Removing Religious Prejudices (1791); General Committee of Roman Catholics (1792); A Report of the Debate … for the Purpose of Considering the Propriety of Adopting the Declaration of the General Committee of the Roman Catholics of Ireland (1792); A Candid Enquiry, Whether the Roman Catholics of Ireland, Ought or Ought Not to be Admitted to the Rights of Subjects (1792); The Address of the Association of the Friends of the Constitution, Liberty and Peace, in Ireland ([1793]); The Petition of the Catholics of Ireland, to the King’s Most Excellent Majesty (1793); Defence of the Sub-Committee of the Catholics of Ireland (1793); An Irishman’s Letter to the People called Defenders ([c.1793]); Proceedings of the Society of United Irishmen of Dublin ([1793]); An Act for the Relief of His Majesty’s Popish, or Roman Catholic Subjects of Ireland (1793), in The Statutes at Large [Ireland]; An Act to prevent the Election or Appointment of Unlawful Assemblies (1793) in The Statutes at Large [Ireland]; The Address of the Poor People of Munster, to their Fellows in Ireland, with their Bill of Grievances Annexed ([c.1794]); Address from the Society of United Irishmen of Dublin, to the People of Ireland (1794); Society of United Irishmen of Dublin (1794), excerpts; [William Bruce and Henry Joy (eds)], Belfast Politics (1794), excerpts; Henry Grattan’s Proposal for a Bill for the Relief of His Majesty’s Roman Catholic Subjects (4th May 1795), in The Speeches of the Righ Honourable Henry Grattan (1822), excerpt; Speech of Arthur O’Connor Esq in the House of Commons of Ireland, Monday, May 4th, 1795, on the Catholic Bill (1795); A Fair Statement, of the Administration of Earl Fitzwilliam (1795); An Irishman’s Second Letter to the People called Defenders ([1795]); An Act More Effectually to Suppress Insurrections (1796), in The Statutes at Large [Ireland]; An Act to Prevent and Punish Tumultuous Risings (1796), in The Statutes at Large [Ireland]; Thomas Russell, A Letter to the People of Ireland, on the Present Situation of the Country (1796); Arthur O’Connor, A Letter to the Electors of Antrim (1797); G Lake, Proclamation to the People of the Province of Ulster (1797); The Appeal of the People of Ulster to their Countrymen, and to the Empire at Large (1797); Address of the Inhabitants of the County of Armagh to Such of their Roman Catholic Brethren as have been Driven from their Country by the Late Persecution ([c.1797]); An Act to Explain More Effectually to Suppress Insurrections, and Prevent the Disturbance of the Public Peace (1797), in The Statutes at Large [Ireland]; ‘The Declarations, Resolutions and Constitution of the United Irishmen’, Journals of the House of Commons of the Kingdom of Ireland (1797)

Volume 5: 1797–1800
Orange Lodges [of] the Province of Ulster, held in the Town of Armagh, on Sunday the 21st of May, 1797 (1797); Earl of Moira’s Speech to the British House of Lords, 22 November 1797, in William Cobbett (ed.), The Parliamentary History of England (1818); A Letter to the Earl of Moira, in Defence of the Conduct of His Majesty’s Ministers, and of the Army in Ireland (1797); Report of the Debate on Lord Moira’s Motion, for an Address to the Lord Lieutenant, Recommending Conciliatory Measures on Behalf of the People of Ireland (1798); ‘Behaviour of the Armed Forces Prior to the Rebellion’, in The Diary of Sir John Moore, ed J F Maurice, 2 vols (1904), vol 1, excerpts; An Irish Emigrant, The Causes of the Rebellion in Ireland Disclosed in an Address to the People of England ([1798]); Dr John Thomas Troy, RCAD, Pastoral Instruction to the Roman Catholics of the Archdiocess of Dublin (1798); ‘Public Notices on the Irish Rebellion of 1798’ [Government Bulletin, May 1798]; Castlereagh and the United Irish Prisoners (1798), in Memoirs and Correspondence of Viscount Castlereagh, ed. Charles Vane, Marquess of Londonderry, 4 vols (1848), vol 1, excerpt; ‘Communications passed between the Government and the State Prisoners’ in Memoirs and Correspondence of Viscount Castlereagh (1798); Report from the Committee of Secrecy, of the House of Commons of Ireland (1798); Report from the Committee of Secrecy, of the House of Lords in Ireland, 2nd edn (1798); General Humbert to the French Troops and to the Irish Nation (1798), in Memoirs and Correspondence of Viscount Castlereagh (1848), vol 1, excerpt; [Waterhouse Crymble Lindsay], A Letter to His Grace the Lord Primate of Ireland (1798); Arthur O’Connor's Letter to Lord Castlereagh ([c.1799]); An Orangeman, A Letter to Theobald McKenna, Esq. The Catholic Advocate; in reply to the Calumnies against the Orange Institution (1799); Snowden Cupples, The Principles of the Orange Association ([1799]); Discussions on the Union between the Duke of Portland and Lord Cornwallis (1798–1800), in Memoirs and Correspondence of Viscount Castlereagh (1848), vol 2, excerpts; Rules and Regulations for the Use of all Orange Societies (1800)

Volume 6: 1798–1805
Joshua Spencer, Thoughts on an Union (1798); [Edward Cooke], Arguments For and Against an Union, between Great Britain and Ireland, Considered, 8th edn (1798); A Report of the Debate of the Irish Bar … on the Subject of an Union of the Legislatures of Great Britain and Ireland (1799); [Charles Kendal Bushe], The Union. Cease Your Funning (1798); Theobald McKenna, A Memoire on Some Questions Reflecting the Projected Union of Great Britain and Ireland (1799); An Old Friend, An Address to the Roman Catholics of Ireland (1799); John Collis, An Address to the People of Ireland, on the Projected Union (1799); John Hamilton, A Letter to Theobold McKenna, Esq. (1799); [Roger O’Connor], An Address to the People of Ireland; Shewing them Why they Ought to Submit to an Union (1799); Dr Dodd, Calm Considerations on the Probable Consequences of an Union of the Kingdom of Ireland with that of Great Britain (1799); 'Hibernicus' [pseud.], English Union, is Ireland’s Ruin! or An Address to the Irish Nation (1799); The Speech of Henry Grattan, Esq. on the subject of a Legislative Union with Great Britain (1800); An Act for the Union of Great Britain and Ireland, in The Statutes at Large [England] (1800); ‘The Indictment of Robert Emmet, his Reply, and an Account of his Insurrection (1803)’, in The Life, Trial and Conversations of Robert Emmet, Leader of the Irish Insurrection of 1803 (1836); [Theobald McKenna], An Abstract of the Arguments on the Catholic Question (1805)

Editor: Harry T Dickinson, University of Edinburgh

This title is now available to buy from ebrary:

ISBNs: 9781848933002 978-1-84893-300-2 ISBNs: 9781848933019 978-1-84893-301-9 ISBNs: 9781781445594 978-1-78144-559-4 ISBNs: 9781781445600 978-1-78144-560-0

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